Should I put a job I was (relatively amicably) fired from on a resume if I was only there 2 months?

Hi! I'm looking for some advice after recently being fired from a job that I had taken on a whim after quitting Americorps back in February. It was to be a receptionist at a medical marijuana evaluation clinic (not a dispensary, a doctor's office). I had never worked in customer service before-my previous work, besides working in a school for Americorps, was working as a security guard at a couple of museums. customer service honestly isn't my first choice when looking for a job-I'm hoping to find another job as museum security (or other personnel), or working with children or the elderly, but am open-minded. I'm wondering if I should bother placing my (not so great) experience at this job on my resume since I was only there for 2 months and have other experience (albeit not tons) to put down.

My hesitations: 1.My boss has an alternate name registered for her business that is fairly generic and does not reference marijuana. however, when entered as a google query, it returns results for the actual business, which does have 'canna' in the name. 2. I'd like to work in education or with kids again if possible, or with the elderly, or in a museum, or for a government agency. I'm motivated primarily by civil service and feel like most of these institutions will frown upon me having worked in the medical marijuana industry. 3. I don't want it to look like I wasn't really doing anything for 2 months, though I do deal with some health issues and could likely blow it off as illness and preparing for graduate school.More information below, but it's a bit tl;dr-I worked as a receptionist in a medical marijuana evaluation clinic for almost 2 months, and then was fired because they felt I wasn't really great at the job. I would like to return to working with children or in a museum like I have in the past, and am not sure if I should include the receptionist job on my resume, or if it is worse for it to look like I wasn't doing anything for a few months.

I'll be beginning my Master's in History with the ambitious hope of one day getting a doctorate and being on a curatorial team, which is why I had enjoyed working in museums. I had been offered the job in the medical marijuana clinic going in for my own evaluation-they said they weren't sure if they were going to keep one of the girls that had called in sick (this should have been red flag number one) and asked if I could come in the next day for a "working interview". They pretty much hired me on the spot and had me fill out an application later.

I struggled to keep up with the pace of the work and the attention to detail it required. I frequently apologized for this-my boss indicated that it was okay, as I was still learning, and that she would teach me more once I "mastered" my front desk role. Last Saturday, my boss had 3 women of various ages come in for interviews (this should have been red flag number 2-I made a joke about being nervous to my boss, even). I normally have Mondays off, but had been coming in Mondays since my boss was moving and needed to be out of the office. She asked me if i was coming in, and I asked if it was alright if I took the day off since I was losing my voice-she said this was fine, as she herself had been fighting off bronchitis, and the other 2 young women working in the office had been sick. I ended up getting treated at an urgent care and missing 2 more days of work. My boss ignored my texts and a call, telling me she would "see me in the morning" . Fast forward to Thursday, I get to work and start opening, she comes in, tells me she needs to talk to me, and immediately starts telling me that she "doesn't think this business relationship is going to work out". She tells me I have a "sweet and friendly personality" but "wasn't catching on enough" and that it was best for the efficiency for the office if I wasn't there. It was a complaint that I took too long with individual patients; the clinic's primary function was as a business, while I admittedly am more care-minded. She told me I needed to 'focus on my career in museums' and 'would do great' in that field. I understood, gave her my key, and left pretty peacefully-she was looking for employees she could train to run the business in her absence, and growing up with entrepreneur parents gave me a relative distaste for the small business world. I did text her a day later stating I thought it was shitty for her to wait to fire me until after I had taken steroids to get better-I definitely would not have taken steroids to recover from illness if I did not intend to come back to work.

The more time passes, I keep counting a list of red flags: 1. They hired me because they weren't sure if they were going to keep a recent hire after she got sick. They never actually fired this employee, and ended up promoting her. 2. She interviewed 3 women in 1 morning, though job interviews aren't exactly a common thing for her. These interviews were a lot more formal than my "working" interview, where I shadowed a couple of employees for a few hours and then had a small 5-minute interview. I have a feeling she had one of these women come in to cover my shift while I was sick, similarly to how I was initially hired. 3. Employees were paid in cash, though this business had been established for almost 10 years. This means that I need to file a 10-99 as an independent contractor for work I did as a front desk receptionist. 4. One of my coworkers warned me upon starting that it "wasn't great pay, only 10 dollars an hour", but I was able to negotiate a 11.50 starting rate for myself (which may have screwed me in the end). This coworker was a few years younger, but already had a child and was married (I am engaged, but do not have children). I was told by my boss explicitly not to discuss pay with her. 5. Business owners were generally tacky (sorry, but H2s are really tacky), drove expensive cars and lived fairly luxurious lives because they could.

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